Thursday, September 29, 2016

Bureau of Indian Affairs SUED for $89 Million for ViOLATIONS of ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES ACT and BREACH of Fiduciary Duty

A long simmering complaint of the real San Pasqual Descendants is reaching it's boiling point.  And we have the complaint linked below. 

The Bureau of Indian affairs has wrongfully enrolled non-San Pasqual Indians to the San Pasqual tribe, which is destroying and eroding the culture and tradition of this great tribe.  Director Amy Dutschke seems to have put the BIA in an awkward position with failure to notify the true San Pasqual descendants. 55  pages of responsive documents received via FOIA show once again they never gave notice to the true San Pasqual descendants enrolled by the SAN PASQUAL TRIBE in 2005.   So WHAT were they trying to do?

The 90 or so plaintiffs contend that the BIA have statutory rights to be federally recognized as members of the tribe. They are filing the suit to protect those rights.



Brief history:  In the late 1870's, a white man from Ohio by the name of Calvin Washburn set fire to the San Pasqual village and patented the land himself. He later sold the land to a man named Bevington, who had the San Pasqual legally ejected from their ancestral lands.

Although the true Kumeyaay lived in and around their land for years, it wasn't until 1910 that the government set aside land for them that was barren, rocky, and had no water. However, the San Pasqual had been successful farmers and saw that they could not cultivate on this land.

Therefore, the San Pasqual refused to settle on the land. Being that the land in the area was still subject to squatters; the Bureau hired a descendant of another white pioneer from Ohio to act as a caretaker of the land on behalf of the San Pasqual. The caretaker’s name was Frank Trask. Frank Trask was married to a half-blood Native American from the Mesa Grande Diegueno tribe. They moved on to the San Pasqual land in 1910.

 You can find the complaint here   The BIA have been SERVED.  As usual, they will probably drag their feet, but we will be sure to discuss this during our protest march in Sacramento October 6 & 7.  Please join us, please tell your friends and family that are local.

READ  MORE on San Pasqual at these links:

BIA ADMITS to having documents in San Pasqual Applicants Case
San Pasqual Lawsuit
San Pasqual Split
San Pasqual Must Lose Right to Run Valley View
San Pasqual Members DENIED their Civil Rights says BIA

We posted a letter of support on this issue in 2009.  Is the BIA trying to show CONTEMPT for the San Pasqual Descendants, or trying to hide their contempt? Sen. Dianne Feinstein is aware of the issues.

44 comments:

Anonymous said...

Check out the Unknown to the Known article at Pala Watch.The same shit has happened at Pala.Fat Boy smith and the Bastard lugos have no business being enrolled and they're the ones causing the problems disenrollments or murder its all them.

nickey said...

It sounds so complicated. The Chukchansi tribe's mess about who belongs and who needs to go just seems to worsen everyday.

Anonymous said...

Amy has never done a good job, she must take money or sex? or something for letting these leaders get away with their crap. Amy is responsible and she will have her pay back for sure, her nieces too, Sarah and the other one who takes the papers at the BIA. Think about this for a minute, you have Howard Dickstein who made sure Amy got her job, and you have Howard supporting 8 tribes who disenrolled, you have Amy getting enrolled in one of them, you have one tribe complaining about Howard to Amy, and then to the Board for the California Bar, where at that time,Howard's wife Jeannine English was the one who accepted any incoming complaints, hmmm, (wonder why he never had complaints formally filed), that tribe was paid to shut them up and sty out of court, so Amy would not be in trouble, $16,000,000 where just about the same time Robert Smith made a so called "bad investment" with tribal money and lost $16,000,000. Then you have Sarah, Amy's niece, who just so happens to be a Lawyer for Pala, involved with a group of lawyers who claim to be against disenrollment, but then Sarah is the lawyer who headed up the disenrollments in Pala. All around the same time frame. Then you have Sarah's sister who accepts all incoming paperwork at the BIA in Sacramento, hmmm and somehow Amy always knows who is doing what and then she reports to her tribal leader friends like Robert Smith exactly what is going on at the BIA with other tribes. Even tribes who think they have privacy, they don't, she shares there information with certain people. She was supposed to retire, but it looks like she needs to destroy some more people before she leaves. Hope she is finally caught and put in prison where she belongs, but that probably won't happen, so hope she loses a case or just retires.

Anonymous said...

The funny thing about this is how many times REZTALK people say its not about the money, then they sue for 89 million. HAHAHAHAHA. Its all about the money. Typical Casino Indians. Bunch of Hypocrites

O Pechanga said...

If they didn't put damages into the complaint, it would invalidate the filing...
The Casino Indians in the tribes ALSO say it's not about the money, yet couldn't wait to get their increases.

WeRone said...

The #TRUTH is none of this occurred at this level until casinos and money occurred. $$$$ is the root of ALL evils occurring in Indian country. Enrollment was open yearly then???? Total reverse occurred and lies and misinformation occurred, and the greedy group rose up and did everything they could to take others rights and flush them down the toilet. Sad But TRUE

Kumeyaay Queen said...

Mr.Anonymous- 1:47 PM.......
You seem to be Observing our case closely... You claim to know how many times REZTALK people posted - "Its not About Money"...lol...We wonder if you "Are you a Stalker" or Fan"? But we do know your Obviously a "punk Coward". "for the fact That you "posted this comment on "Anonymous". "You need to follow my lead" Mr Anonymous 1;47, get some real native Balls, post your "Identity" 'don't be a "little Queer Fag, and post Insults about my People. (for you wouldn't step up and tell us in our " Cute faces".... Mr. Anonymous 1:47. As for you Mr Pechanga You don't need to co-sign at 1:52 pm. right after Anonymous 1:47 ....it makes you look like your in Collusion. lmfao!...Really tho"(have some hacker class)....As for Mr Amy Dutschke, That Big Beast Cow "Has severe Old Timers..And her own family takes advantage of her as well, And her Incest with her relative Jospeh Dutshke has hit her in a very Karmatic way...boo! ... "Soon "Native Country will know She is not in her right state of Mind. 'But we all know, and must remeber~ THE lovely B.I.A. has always had a sick Escape goat. like Victoria Muncey..

Anonymous said...

Interesting...until the Spaniards began using Diegeno, Luiseno, Mission, ect to describe the Indians in this region, they were virtually ALL Kuumeyay...there were villages, to be sure...but until the federal government set up reservations, Indians were fre to move about. Can anyone prove that the current members are not in fact Kuumeyay?

Reinstatement_Restitution said...

There is nothing wrong with Indians that have compensatory interests in land, assets, and resources to files claims for damages. The insinuation that those who press such claims are greedy instead of "true" Indians who only care about their heritage is insulting.

Many tribal leaders are stealing money and shutting people out to increase their share. If you want to talk greed it does not get any more blatant. Are these the "true" Indians?

Playing the "greed card" is getting old at this point. Living in modern times requires money. Not a one of us can live on our heritage.

Anonymous said...

Well, reinstatement, then one would expect the aggrieved to refuse any compensation, if it's not about the money...furthermore, any revenue from gaming would also be refused. Playing the "insulting " card doesn't work, either...

Reinstatement_Restitution said...

Filing a claim against the U.S. has nothing to do with gaming revenue. You're reasoning is suspect. A claim for financial compensation as a remedy for injury and harm due to violations of the A.P.A. is a strong legal action. I admire the Plaintiffs resolve.

Anonymous said...

So 5:35PM then according to you, if someone steals from you, you are fine with it and will not have them arrested and get compensated for what was stolen? Where do you live, I am sure many people will line up to relieve you of your burden.

Anonymous said...

Read what I said, not what you think I said...and your analogy is suspect. you are the one talking about needing money to live in modern times. Is this your justification for suing?

Anonymous said...


Interesting...September 29, 2016 at 3:25 p.m. YES, I can prove that the current members of the San Pasqual Tribe are NOT Kumeyaay. In fact, I can prove that they are overwhelmingly WHITE. They descendant from the white Ohio farmers that burned the true Kumeyaay San Pasqual off of their land. I can prove that they do not belong to the San Pasqual Tribe, rather that they, like their Ohio white ancestors, are land thieves. Yes, I can prove that it was exposed in 1955 that the Trask's had kept the true San Pasqual off of their land. Yes, I can prove that one single LIE by Lenora LaChappa Trask Sholder Ames was used by YOU, Dave Toler, to justify your right to be on land Trust Patented to the true San Pasqual and that you possess NO San Pasqual blood whatsoever. I can also prove that the corruption relating to your enrollment is completely based on a lie. I can also prove that you were enrolled under part 76, which is not the enrollment statue. I can also prove that you do not qualify for enrollment under part 48, the ONLY enrollment statute.
September 29, 2016 at 3:25 PM

Anonymous said...

Without DNA from everyone involved, "proving " who is or is not Kuumeyay is problematic. I am not Dave Toler... I do, however know the Trask history. I won't waste my time explaining it to you. Just answer this...just exactly what is a TRUE San Pasqual Indian? About the "overwhelmingly white" part...how much white blood do YOU have ? How about Mexican blood? If you are going to blame your problems on something that happened over one hundred years ago, when none of the people you are complaining about were close to being born, why not go back to when no reservations existed? When we were ALL Kuumeyay? Your "history " is selective...you choose what suits your needs and ignore the fact that we were once the same people.

Reinstatement_Restitution said...

The claim is filed against the BIA (U.S.). The BIA made decisions based on regulations and policies that were designed to herd Indians onto reservations so their land could be settled by others. It was a humiliating and damaging time when Indians were viewed as savages and barbaric. Those policies and regulations have changed and a policy of self determination for Indians ensued. The change in policy was not accompanied by an effort to correct past decisions that harmed Indians. The federal government thought that Indians could solve the problems created by failed policies and regulations.

This is what the Indians of California are dealing with. The BIA wants the tribes to fix the problems they created. This has resulted in disenrollments as tribes seek to determine who belongs and who was included because it suited the BIA at the time. Neither the tribes nor the BIA acts to protect the rights of the those who have been harmed. This is a violation of due process. The BIA also supports disenrollments and resorts to a policy of non-intervention to help tribes eliminate members.

The result is a justifiable cause of action, and in this case has led to claims for damages. The insinuation that Indians who are pursuing their right to belong to their own tribes are greedy because they seek to share in the benefits of tribal membership is insulting. These Indians want to restore their heritage, the legacy that comes from their ancestors, and to belong to the community. If there is gaming money involved, it should be shared among all members since it is a tribal investment.

When these Indians say it is not about the money, they mean that if there was no money involved they would still wish to be tribal members. Disenrollment strips away tribal membership, and denies sharing to the entitled. Disenrolled Indians are no less Indian when they pursue their rightful place in the community, the legacy of their ancestors, their cultural heritage and the benefits that go along with it.

DNA cannot prove tribal membership. It can show Native American markers, and can prove lineal descent from a parent. At this point blood degree is used more to discriminate than to establish ethnicity. What makes an Indian is different for each tribe, however, once the federal government approves a membership roll for a tribe there should be a process where the federal government provides due process if the tribe attempts to remove a member.

That is why so many are suing the BIA. The BIA originally decided who was Indian and approved those people for membership. Then the BIA approved the enrollment ordinances. When the BIA allows tribes to destroy Indians without following the tribal law, or by challenging blood degree that has already been determined, or to selectively target Indians for removal without observing the ICRA then the injured Indians should be able to seek recourse without being called greedy.

Anonymous said...

R&R is right, and not to mention that disenrollment causes an immense amount of emotional and mental depression. Not only do you lose your tribal rights, your health care, your per-cap, but if you work for the tribe, you lose your job, if you live on the rez, you lose your house immediately. You have just had everything stolen from you, by the people who were considered your leaders, your representatives, the same people you have lived among your whole life, the people you call cuz, brother, or friend. Then other members of the tribe start sneering at you, mocking you, threatening you, because those same leaders have immensely bad mouthed you and your whole family. The fact that where you have belonged your whole life, the place you have always called home, the people you have always known as family, has been literally stripped out from underneath you and you have absolutely no say, you have the proof, you have the truth, but that does not matter. Then you have people who try to justify the actions of the tribal leaders, people who have no right being there in the first place trying to tell you,you who have been part of the tribe for generations, that you do not belong. I hope no one else ever has to go through this.

Anonymous said...

I don't necessarily disagree with you, but tribal enrollment has never been absolute...resolutions approved by the general council can modify tribal law...tribal enrollment is virtually the only self determination left to American Indians. The government has consistently allowed tribes/bands to decide who may or may not be enrolled, fair or not. Since you acknowledge what I already knew, DNA cannot determine who is and who isn't a member of a particular band. You ignore the fact that we were once the same people.

I am guessing that you are the attorney representing the so called disenfranchised...Reztalk typically doesn't write this well.

I have no stake in what happens, but I stumbled across the Reztalk hit piece, and that's what it is, nothing more.

White Buffalo said...

Is there any way to put a like and reply button?

Anonymous said...

Regarding the 10:47 post...

How self righteous of you. You are trying to do the same thing to the Trask family that you are complaining about. You talk about other tribal members sneering, threatening you, ect...really? Go back and read the attacks on Reztalk. You will not lose your health benefits provided by IHC. The rest of it? Unfortunately, probably...but if your lawsuit is successful, you are going to do the same thing to your opponents.

There are few things more vicious than tribal politics...stacking meetings, collusion, conspiracy...it happens at every tribe/band. I have seen it firsthand...it is sickening.

Reinstatement_Restitution said...

Let's get it straight. I am not an attorney, and I only represent myself. You can remove the so-called and refer to disenrollees as disenfranchised, because that is a matter of fact.

My people are not Dieguenos, and never have been, so we are not all the same people. There are real distinctions in terms of language, culture, and religion that separate peoples in Southern California aside from the labels that were put upon Indians by the federal government.

For many Indian entities, final decision authority over tribal enrollment was vested in the BIA. That means that the BIA could include or exclude Indians from tribes, bands, rancherias, or whatever group designation the federal government placed on the Indian groups that remained after the U.S. assumed control of California. The BIA often amalgamated Indians of different groups into one group for administrative reasons, sometimes forcing hereditary enemies to join together.

That is why I say that the BIA should not allow tribes to disenroll members of federally approved rolls without providing due process. This would require the BIA to conduct hearings where disenrollees could present their side of the dispute outside of the tribe where decisions are often controlled by those who wish to oust them.

There are many decisions that invoke the self determination of tribes besides enrollment. The federal government allow tribes to determine their own form of government, their own laws, their own means of promoting their culture and protecting their heritage and much more.

This lawsuit is against the United States. The San Pasqual Band will not have to pay damages, reinstate disenrolled members, or enroll members whose enrollment has been on hold until the matter is resolved. Anyone who says otherwise is misinformed.

Anonymous said...

@12:04, I am not of this tribe, I am from another tribe and was disenrolled, I know the pain, I know the procedures, I know the lies, I live the hell. I still am Native, I will always fight, and I respect my ancestors. AHO!

Anonymous said...

I have dealt with the BIA. They never dictated policy. They simply made sure that we were adhering to our particularl tribal constitution. The problem is that virtually all tribal law never allowed for the complexities of today. They acted as a referee, not final authority. They encouraged tribes to handle their enrollment privately...they preferred not to be involved. I know what tribes can and cannot do... I have been there. They can do anything that is not contrary to federal and local law...just like everyone else. Their rules and regulations are similar to any city council ordinances, and Roberts Rules, except for enrollment. That is an Indian issue...a sovereignty issue.

Anonymous said...

What would be a good way for the BIA to six this mess? Could they tell all tribes that want to disenroll that they must go through a tribal court so all parties have representtion, or can they tell tribal leaders that the whole tribe must agree on it, or can they say that if a tribe insists on disenrolling without going through the right process, then that tribe will relinquish their sovereignty for that issue? I do not know, but it would be nice if they could come up with a solution, because many true natives are suffering. They could promise disenrollees a tribal card and start their own tribe so they could get their true rights back. They need to do something and they need to prosecute Amy!

Anonymous said...

Reinstatement_Restitution said... at 10:04 a.m. BRAVO! BRAVO!

Anonymous said...

R-R, you answered your question in your 1:46 pm post ..."the federal government allows tribes to determine their own form of government, their own laws, ect..." Each tribe is allowed to set up their own enrollment determination, NOT the BIA...some tribes use the BIA as a "referee"...others have decided to exclude the BIA from their enrollment process. Unless or until the federal government decides to intervene, nothing will change. If the Feds do intervene, tribal sovereignty, the ability to decide for themselves who will be enrolled, is lost.

This is not the BIAs mess...this is a tribal mess.

Reinstatement_Restitution said...

I didn't really ask a question, and I guess I failed to make my point. Let's try again. Prior to the change in federal policy to promote tribal self-determination, which culminated in the Indian Self Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975, the BIA made decisions for tribes. The agency controlled finances, education, resource allocation, and made all business decisions. Tribal membership was informal and based on census records of reservation inhabitants or rolls of Indians who were allotted land on reservations or a combination of the two. I am speak only of California. Tribes outside of California had different conditions.

It was during this time that many of the problematic membership rolls were created. After Santa Clara Pueblos v. Martinez in 1978 it became law that tribes had the right to determine their own membership. However, that did not correct past errors. There were errors in blood degree, in tribal affiliation, and in lineage that the agency never corrected. Instead the BIA bailed out of the mess, and let the Indians have at it.

This opened the door to the resurrection of long standing feuds and to tribes questioning the right to belong of certain individuals whose membership was approved by the BIA. That is why I say the BIA has a responsibility to provide due process to disenrollees so that the true reason for disenrollment can be understood and to not let tribes capriciously terminate legitimate members.

Anonymous said...

Ok, then..unless two different people posted the posts that I am referring to, in your 2:37 post, you asked four questions in the first two sentences. You then provided an answer in your 1:46 post.

Before the 1975 ruling and after the 1975 ruling are two separate issues. Did you expect the BIA to go back and change the past? Good luck with that.

I do understand where you are coming from, but if we give the BIA the authority to determine what you are asking for, there goes tribal sovereignty. Is that what you want? If you think things are bad now, wait until the federal government starts running our lives...

The biggest single problem in Indian Country is...Indians. We are our own worst enemy. We do this to ourselves. Rez vs urban...gaming vs non- gaming...internal family vs family, one family vs another family. If we as a whole were honorable people, this wouldn't be an issue...

Reinstatement_Restitution said...

I did not post at 2:37 so it was someone else's question that you answered with my comment. The Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975 is not a ruling. It is an Act of Congress designed to encourage tribes to make their own decisions through a process of consultation and directed federal aid.

You ask "did you expect the BIA to go back and change the past?" Of course it is impossible to change the past. What I expect is that the BIA will consult with tribes when they attempt to disenroll members, examine the decisions that led to the enrollment dispute, and encourage tribes to avoid terminating long-time members or those that can demonstrate that they were enrolled based upon a decision made by the Bureau which was previously accepted by the tribe.

The BIA has the authority to approve or deny participation in federal programs and should use that authority to deny federal funds to tribes that disenroll without just cause, or in contradiction to votes of the general membership, or in violation of tribal law, or in violation of the ICRA. This would not be an abrogation of tribal sovereignty, but would be a sanction against capricious disenrollment.

Those who favor disenrollment often rely on tribal sovereignty as a means to prevent intervention with illicit decisions. Intervention is not the only recourse that the federal government has to assist tribes with membership disputes. I have offered three alternatives now. Protection of civil rights through hearings with an independent tribunal, consultation with tribes to determine whether or not there is just cause, and sanctions against tribes that disenroll without just cause, due process, or against the wishes of the general membership.

Any one of these alternatives would help to avoid the never-ending stream of litigation.

Anonymous said...

I know it's an act of congress...probably take another act of congress to change it...maybe not...

Expecting, examining and encouraging still leaves enrollment decisions up to the tribe/band ...denying funding or imposing sanctions runs into sovereignty issues...you can't have it both ways.

I would support some kind of control mechanism, but the gaming tribes and their far reaching political influence will play a large part in determining what happens.

How do you want this to impact the Trask issue? Reztalk is in full attack mode. There are certainly ulterior motives in play.

Reinstatement_Restitution said...

I don't think it is desirable to repeal the Indian Self-Determination Act. Instead it would be good if the BIA properly consulted with tribes as required by the Act. Few have challenged it so the BIA consults when it seems necessary and allows far to many problems to be handled by tribal governments that are unprepared for the complexities of their own laws.

It should still be left up to the Indian entity to make enrollment decisions. They might think twice if federal funding was at stake. Imposing sanctions does not abrogate sovereignty. The tribe would still make the decision. However there would be consequences for an improper decision. This is no different from the way the U.S. deals with governments that make decisions that violate treaties or international law. Sanctions are imposed to show that improper decisions are not acceptable.

Since I have no vested interest in the status of the Trasks my opinion is entirely objective. If one family is denied membership because of new evidence, the BIA should also review other families if new evidence is brought forth. However, the BIA will only review issues raised by the Band's enrollment committee. This is a violation of due process. The Band should not determine how the BIA reviews issues brought forth by members whose status is challenged. It is obviously discriminatory.

Anonymous said...

The Trask's need to remove themselves from the conflicts of interest regarding an examination of their bloodlines. And, for the record, no one is saying that they don't have native blood. They do. They are Mesa Grande blood. Alan and Cheryl, from their mother, have Miwok and PitRiver. The issue is that none of them belong enrolled in San Pasqual. They have NO San Pasqual blood, whatsoever.

Finally, consider how it feels for the true San Pasqual descendants to be kept from exercising their rights due to the corruption of the descendants of the white people from Ohio that burned their San Pasqual ancestors off of their land in 1878. And, let no one forget that it was exposed in 1955 California Senate Hearings, that between 1910 and 1955 that same family would not ALLOW the San Pasqual Indians on to the reserve that was set aside and trust patented to them.

Anonymous said...

About the Oct 4th, at 8:36 am post...

When the residents of the San Pasqual valley were forced from their land, many of them relocated to the Mesa Grande area, later becoming a reservation populated with former residents of the San Pasqual valley. (Look it up) The San Pasqual reservation was established in 1910. The Indians living in Mesa Grande that had once lived in San Pasqual valley had every right to migrate to the new San Pasqual reservation. It is entirely possible that Frank Trask's wife was a descendant of the original San Pasqual valley Indians. Can anyone prove otherwise? DNA won't prove anything...anecdotal evidence isn't admissible, BIA records from that time aren't reliable...

Reinstatement_Restitution said...

If the BIA records are unreliable, why are they being used to disenroll some members and to support enrollment for others?

The BIA has not investigated the Trask bloodline while it has scrutinized the Alto bloodline. If the BIA honored the ICRA it would provide equal protection under the law to both groups. Instead the BIA has allowed the Trasks to challenge the membership eligibility of the Altos without investigating the Trasks. 25 C.F.R. 48.14 (d)'s provision for new evidence does not specifically state that is must come from the enrollment committee, only that eligibility can be reviewed if new data is provided that shows the initial enrollment decision "was based on information subsequently determined to be inaccurate."

The compelling evidence disputing the Trask's eligibility deserves the same scrutiny as that placed on the Alto's. Anything else is a violation of equal protection under the law. The Court consistently glosses over civil rights violations in disenrollment cases. I have said it before. Disenrollees are American Citizens and entitled to the civil rights guarantees of the U.S. Constitution. The ICRA does not apply to them once their membership is revoked. At the same the ICRA does apply to the BIA and the Indian entity and both must observes the civil rights of individual Indians disenrolled or not.

How does this get swept under the rug with every case?

Anonymous said...

R-R at 9:10pm...

The Alto case was about whether they were Indian or not...they were Mexican. You acknowledge that the Lawson's, ect are Indian...the issue is what band they actually belong to. Oranges and apples...

It is possible that Frank Trask's wife descends from the original inhabitants of the San Pasqual valley. Can anyone prove otherwise?

Reinstatement_Restitution said...

You are saying the Lawsons are Indian. I made no such statement. Nor did I make any assessment regarding the status of the Altos. You have imposed your own reasoning on my comments. I was talking about civil rights and equal protection.

Anonymous said...

October 5, 2016 at 7:33 PM AND October 5, 2016 at 9:33 PM

It is unequivocal that the Ancestors of the true San Pasqual descendants who are suing the BIA are THE true San Pasqual. Their direct ancestors NEVER went to Mesa Grande, ever. In due time, it will be exposed where THEIR direct ancestors lived. It has been documented by more than one historical source.

"It is entirely possible that Frank Trask's wife was a descendant of the original San Pasqual valley Indians." Can anyone prove otherwise? YES it can be proven, just like it was proven that the Alto family had NO San Pasqual blood, but their ancestor was a Mexican baby that was adopted by Maria Alto.

"DNA won't prove anything...anecdotal evidence isn't admissible, BIA records from that time aren't reliable . . . ." Well, guess what, DNA testing of several blood lines from San Pasqual have been done over a period of time by many of the direct lineal San Pasqual descendants, as well as other True San Pasqual blood lines and they interconnect. DNA from a Trask has been taken and they DON'T connect. While the office of Federal Recognition may not recognize DNA, the True San Pasqual Descendants KNOW.

"You acknowledge that the Lawson's, ect are Indian...the issue is what band they actually belong to." Anonymous at 9:33 p.m. It CAN be proven that they were Mesa Grande Indians, as well as Feliciana was no less than 1/2 Mexican.

"It is possible that Frank Trask's wife descends from the original inhabitants of the San Pasqual valley." No, Lenora LaChappa, Trask, Sholder, Ames, had absolutely NO San Pasqual blood. And, not one of her descendants can provide any credible evidence that any of her ancestors were even in the San Pasqual Valley. In fact, there is an ancient document that specifically notes that the LaChappa's were NOT San Pasqual; that they lived in a different area; that they spoke a different language; an of course, none of their descendants know the San Pasqual songs, dances or real history, today. That is because they are NOT San Pasqual Indians.

Anonymous, you state, "the issue is what band they actually belong to. Oranges and apples..." I can state with all certainty that the Trasks possess no San Pasqual blood. You say it is apples and oranges? How insulting. Why not enroll the Trask's in Mesa Grande, where documents prove they originated from? Why not enroll the Trask's in Mesa Grande, where Allen Lawson's brother is enrolled [the only honest one of the bunch]? If it only a matter of apples and oranges, then why not enroll them in the Navajo or Campo tribe? It has nothing to do with apples an oranges. To suggest that is insulting. Why not enroll Allen and Cheryl in the Miwok or Pit River tribe? Their mother possessed that blood? It isn't apples and oranges it is SAN PASQUAL BLOOD OF THE BAND.



As far as DNA

Anonymous said...

Hey, anonymous, if the BIA records from that time aren't reliable... then how did the Alto's get disenrolled? Guess what, documents.

There is a letter from 1920. Frank Trask's mother wrote to the BIA and stated he was no a San Pasqual Indian. There is no document anywhere that states that his wife is anything other than Mesa Grande and that she is only 1/2. It was her lying Mexican mother that claimed she was anything more than 1/2 Mesa Grande.

At the end of the day, the Trask's should do the right thing and allow their enrollment to be examined under 48.14(d). If they have nothing to hide, then allow it. Yes, Restitution_Reinstatement, Equal Protection of the laws.

Anonymous said...

White Buffalo said...
Is there any way to put a like and reply button?
September 30, 2016 at 11:30 AM

Yes, please Original Pechanga Blog, we need a like and reply buttons!

Anonymous said...

Well, anonymous on Oct 6 at 7:37pm...

The true San Pasqual...based on what? A particular family bloodline? Based on your comments, only one family was a San Pascual Indian...except that until reservations came to be, there were NO tribes by that name..

I was born in Los Angeles, and yet I am native. I am not related to everyone in my band...the point being that you don't have to be related to someone in particular to be a tribal member.

"Her lying Mexican mother..." You are indeed a class act...speaking ill of the dead. Reztalk is full of those kinds of comments.

Anonymous said...

October 7 at 12:41 p.m. Ahhhhhhhhhhhh, you are one of the casino Indians that came from Los Angeles that cannot prove they are San Pasqual, either. You claim a blood line that is not yours. It's o.k. We know who you are.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous at 12:41 pm...

Nope...wrong again, Reztalk... Try harder. I am who I am...whether I am enrolled or not in my band makes no difference to me, financially or otherwise. I have native blood, but that is not what defines me. I have no vested interest in the outcome of your "crusade"...you're just pissed because someone else put San Pasqual on the map, and now you want to reap the rewards of something you had nothing to do with...a wannabee...good luck with that...

Anonymous said...

October 8, 2016 at 12:36 AM

Ha! Ha! Ha! Really?

It was the true San Pasqual Indians in 1848 that put the San Pasqual on the map and in the history books!

Anonymous said...

-THE ROYAL BLOOD OF THE SAN PASQUAL TRIBE LIVES ETTERNAL..."...MOCCAQUEQUE" LA ROCKA. de DIOS. HAIL...
KING-JOSE JUAN and QUEEN GUADALUPE .MARTINEZ.. .
10O pure KUMEYAAY BLOOD-LINE...