Wednesday, December 23, 2020

Creek Freedmen: Rhonda Grayson and the fight for their BLACK INDIGENOUS Rights

 After working with Cherokee Freedmen to publicize their case for over a decade, the Creek Freedmen (who stood vigil against disenrollment at Pechanga Resort & Casino in Temecula, CA over a decade ago) are gaining traction in their fight against the RACISM that's holding them back from gaining their rights.

We published the NBC post, and now the political online news site THE HILL has published an article on the Creek Freedmen's fight for their treaty rights.


Looks like Rep. Maxine Waters (don't look at me like that) is championing their cause.  She carries a lot of what in Congress and with the Congressional Black Caucus, whose leader Karen Bass has studiously avoided the issue after replacing Diane Watson, who championed the Cherokee Freedmen.  (link to a 2008 post)

I'm working with Rhonda Grayson whose story is told here.  Please help get this story out, by sharing on social media.

Growing up in Oklahoma City, Okla., Rhonda Grayson remembers spending time at her grandparents’ home in the small community of Wewoka — the place where many of her closest family members built their lives. It was there that she was told stories of her ancestors, known as the Creek Freedmen, and learned how to cook traditional Native American dishes such as wild onions with eggs, poke salad made with American pokeweed and hominy, the corn used to make grits.

Grayson says that while she now understands that the food she grew up with is distinctly Native American, it just wasn’t something she thought of at the time. What she did become keenly aware of as she grew older was the push and pull of her two identities, both as an African and a member of the Muscogee Creek Nation, as her people fought for the tribal rights they had long ago been bestowed with. 

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